Monday, May 2, 2016

THE POWER OF THE SPOKEN WORD

I have been exploring how to record a podcast.  My friend from across the pond is curious what a Southern twang sounds like and has suggested I make a recording for the blog.  I went as far as goggling "How to make a podcast".  I read the search titles found by Mr. Google and moved on.  NOT really interested in over crowding the brain cells with another round of once to be used information.  At this stage of the game, I feel it important to conserve what is left for the really important things I need to know---like how to eat your ice cream and not raise you cholesterol level.



I recently made a self video for a friend NOW that could be a solution.  But trying to hold the I phone at the most advantageous angle (hide as many wrinkles as possible) and talk at the same time is FAR above my pay grade.  So for the time being--you will have to endure the words on the page and imagine the twang in my voice as I write.



While trying to figure out how to record my voice, I began to ponder the power contained in our voices.  Personally I am a huge fan of the written word, BUT it leaves much to be desired in the clarity department.  There is usually little or no doubt what one means when we hear the spoken word.  I could write the phrase-"OH NO, YOU DIDN'T" and leave you guessing when out of context as to my true meaning.  Why I could be gleeful with excitement or mad as a wet hornet.  The proof would be in the enunciation, inflection, and volume.


There are some who look upon a rural twang as ignorant and unsophisticated.  Rather than accept disparaging remarks about my accent, I chose to embrace who I am and where I am from.   Frankly I have received many more "Likes" than the spattering of "Dislikes" about my nice little twang.  And with a little effort, I can take all the GRITS out of my voice, but for what reason?  A vain effort to please those who will never be happy?



 And the lilting soft twang has drawn much better responses than red faced, finger pointing, yelling ever did.  There is great power in our voices and the words we choose.  As with all power, it should be used wisely.



What do you imagine the voice of Jesus must have sounded like as He walked this Earth?  When we read through the Gospel accounts of His time here- what inflection, what volume, what enunciation must He have had?  He certainly found occasion for anger as noted in The Temple.  For sure He must have raised His voice on this occasion.  Those other times when He was teaching great crowds, His volume must have been raised--how else could thousands have heard Him.  But those one on one parables---those teachings to the disciples---those healings---I cannot imagine anything but a gentle tone.  The vast majority of His words---I imagine to be spoken in a manner which drew careful attention to His words.  All would have needed to be still and quiet to vigilantly listen to The Master's words.  And the echoes of His Words---have truly been eternal.


A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.
Proverbs 15:1

6 comments:

  1. Yet another wonderful post, Lulu. With plenty for me to comment about. So here goes:

    Coincidence: I often write my Blog posts a week or so in advance. I just posted one on accents; not realising this is what you'd discuss also.

    Your voice: I'm sure your voice and accent are marvellous. That's why I suggested you share it with the rest of us. I'll ask my computer expert if there's an easy way for you to do this. I am not a techi but I managed to record a few videos on You Tube. If I can do it, I am certain it will be very easy for you.

    You're right about Jesus. We read the Bible and can only imagine His tone of voice, volume and accent, if any. I always think He spoke in English. Because most of the Bibles here in the UK, and I suspect where you are too, are written in English. I once read a Bible in French. But could not imagine Jesus or the disciples speaking in French. Can you?

    God bless.

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    1. Great minds think alike, Victor! God certainly always speaks to me in English, Victor, so you must be correct ! We are so arrogant about our language being the correct way, aren't we!
      Blessings, Victor!

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  2. As I was telling my classmates and professor the other day, I work very hard to hide my Midwestern-Southern twang (just ask Sparky!)---as some people do think we are "stupid" or "slow". Since my husband was in the Marines and we traveled, I have picked up on several different accents/can imitate, but the mid western-southern always sticks. Must be something about being born in Indiana and raised in Chicago and Fla and spending 21 years in Alabama. Just saying....lol

    ANYWAYS--great post, Lulu...you and I would have a grand time with each other as only southerners know what we're saying, LOL.

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    1. You have an open invitation to come South and see me anytime, My Friend. It would be GREAT FUN!
      Blessings!

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  3. When visiting San Diego many years ago, servers made me order "bacon and eggs" over and over so they could hear my drawl. I changed restaurants. On a positive note for your video: I've learned a trick from marketing friends. Flattering shots are taken from above and at an angle. Put that camera up high!

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    1. Michelle, I made my friend a video behind a veil- worked really well! It's all great to have our accent, until someone becomes condescending! My reply is always, " I'm not the one with the accent," as I stare them down!
      Good to hear from you! I hope Spring has arrived in TN!
      Blessings!

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Your comments keep my writing and often cause me to think. A written form of a hug or a pat on the back and an occasional slap into reality---I treasure them all!